Gulab Jamun Bundt Cake: A love affair with Sugar and Rose

Gulab Jamun Bundt Cake

Indeed, Gulab Jamun is one of the most loved sweet treats in India. Most compelling evidence, it originally came to India from Persia. And, then evolved. Surprised? Well, it is derived from the Persian words gol (flower) and āb (water) and literally translates to Flower (Rose) Berries (Jamun or Black plum). Traditionally, tiny berry sized dough balls made from milk solids are fried and then soaked in Sugar syrup. But, of course, an ode to this ancient dessert, a twist to the Bundt cake, is this Gulab Jamun Bundt Cake! 

With this in mind, this recipe inspired and adapted from Hetal Vasavada of Milk and Cardamom is a winner. Certainly, it was a superhit on our anniversary this year, a gorgeous looking centerpiece. To emphasize, we have always loved Gulab Jamun, but we savored this delectable Bundt Cake even more!

Gulab Jamun Bundt Cake

Ingredients

For the Sugar Syrup

~ 1 cup granulated sugar
~ 1 cup water 
~ 1 teaspoon saffron
~ 8 pods of crushed cardamom
~ 1 Cinnamon stick – 3 inches long
~ 1 teaspoon Rosewater
~ 2 teaspoon lime juice

For the Bundt Cake

~ 1-1/3 cups all-purpose flour or Maida
~ 1/3 cup Non-Fat Dry Milk Powder
~ 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 
~ 1 cup or 2 sticks of unsalted butter, at room temperature
~ 1 cup granulated sugar
~ 1/2 teaspoon of Kosher Salt
~ 3/4 teaspoon of Ground Cardamom, No Skin
~ 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
~ 4 large eggs, at room temperature

For the Icing/Frosting/Topping

~ 1-3/4 cup Powdered Sugar (However, I used 1-1/2 cup for a thinner and Less Sweet Icing)
~ 1 Tablespoon Dried Rose Petals
~ 1  Tablespoon Thinly Sliced Pistachios

Gulab Jamun Bundt Cake

Directions

In the first place, Preheat Oven to 325 degrees F.

First, mix the dry ingredients of Flour, Milk Powder, and Baking Soda. Then, in a separate larger Container, beat (using stand/ hand electric mixer) Butter and Granulated Sugar. Next, Add Ground Cardamom, Salt, and Vanilla extract and beat again. One by one, add an egg and keep beating each time. Now, once this wet mix is ready, add in the Dry Mix. The Bundt Cake batter is now ready. 

Use the butter paper wrapper to grease the Bundt pan and pour in the batter. Smooth it with a spatula. Put it in the oven, by and large, for 35-40 minutes. When the fork comes out clean, the cake is ready. Thereupon, let it cool on the side. 

Alongside, in a saucepan, Combine Granulated Sugar, Water, and heat to boil. For the essence, add in the saffron, cinnamon stick, and cardamom pods. Once the syrup boils, turn off the flame. To kick in the flavor, add rose water. Lime juice stops crystallization; for this reason, add it in.  

Important to remember, Reserve 1/4 cup Sugar Syrup for the Icing.

Add 3/4 cup slightly warm Sugar syrup into the Bundt Cake Pan so that the cake is soaked in it. In a few minutes, turn the cake upside down on a Cake dish and tap it, so it loosens and comes out. 

Combine Powdered Sugar and the 1/4 cup of sugar syrup and mix it well. 

Pour the icing on the ridge of the Bundt cake to let it flow on the sides. Finally, top with Rose Petals and Sliced Pistachios. If desired, you may also dust some powdered sugar on the cake. 

 
Just a Little Bit More …

~ For one thing, my first introduction to this twist, a next-door Indian NJ-based (also an architect)  small business KneadSomeLoveNY

~ Otherwise, for the traditionalist Indian Sweet lover, my go-to shops in NJ are Mithaas, Bikanervala, Sukhadia’s, and Bengali Sweet House. 

~ In the light of Cakes, if your preference is Citrusy Fruity, head here.

~ Ultimately, my heart calls out for Mumbai Street Food, always!

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Photos by Manjiri Paprikar, Vikrant Dalvi. Unless otherwise noted.